Sunday, May 24, 2020

Emotional Intelligence Training Intervention Cognitive...

Emotional Intelligence Training Intervention There are many facets to leadership, however, Emotional Intelligence (EI) is both the most difficult to develop and the most critical to success. Cognitive intelligence and technical skills are required for most positions, but to be truly effective leaders must also demonstrate emotional intelligence. In today’s ever-changing world, technical skills become obsolete with each new iteration of a process or technology; yet soft-skills, or EI, transcend advancements and industries. â€Å"Leaders high in EI outperform the managers with average people skills† (Lussier Achuea, 2013, p.37). In fact, â€Å"when leadership is examined separately from general occupational performance†¦about 67% of leadership is†¦show more content†¦EI is typically divided into four components – self-awareness, self-regulation, social awareness and relationship management. A person’s emotional intelligence is an overall range or profile that is created by examining their strengths and weaknesses in each of the four components. Self-Awareness â€Å"Self–awareness means having a deep understanding of one’s own emotions, strengths, weaknesses, needs and drives† (Goleman, 1998, p. 95). This translates into several important characteristics of a successful leader. According to Goleman (1998) people with strong self-awareness: †¢ are not overly critical or unrealistically optimistic. Rather, they are honest with themselves and others and acknowledge when it is time to allow others to take the lead. †¢ recognize the impact of their feelings on themselves, other people, and their job performance. †¢ have defined values and goals and make decisions that are in alignment. †¢ take criticism well, learn from their mistakes, and have a self-deprecating sense of humor. †¢ understand the strengths and weaknesses of their skill set and avoid setting themselves up for failure – by either over-reaching or failing to ask for help. Self-Regulation Self-regulation refers to the ability to control or redirect disruptive impulses and moods, and the propensity to